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NASA shares epic shot of the moon’s creepy shadow during June eclipse

The Earth’s multicolor imaging cameras on NASA’s EPIC or NOAA’s deep space climate observation satellites captured the solar eclipse on June 10.

NASA GSFC

During the solar eclipse, the moon blocks the sun, which can result in some really strange shadows and strange lighting on the surface of the earth.

However, observing the same event from space can look a little more creepy.

NASA Earth Multicolor Imaging Camera (EPIC) On board NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), we took a picture of our world above during the annular solar eclipse seen in the Northern Hemisphere on June 10. Shadows cast by the moon appear as strange, unstable, blurred brown spots in the north polar regions.

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This image was taken from the L1 Lagrange point, where the satellite hangs almost a million miles from Earth, and provides a very unique perspective.

“Taking half an image of the Earth’s sun from four times the orbit of the Moon never ceases to provide a surprise.” Adam Sabo, DSCOVR’s NASA project scientist said in a statement.

The June 10 eclipse was a rare ring or “fire ring” eclipse.It also created Lots of great images Some from the surface of our planet, and some from the air.

The next such eclipse is set for October 14, 2023, and it’s a pretty safe bet that some satellites are looking from somewhere.

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NASA shares epic shot of the moon’s creepy shadow during June eclipse Source link NASA shares epic shot of the moon’s creepy shadow during June eclipse